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The Upstream Journal

A magazine on social justice since 1975

Posts Tagged / uganda

  • Dec 05 / 2014
  • 2
Journal

Changing atitudes – the people with disabilities of Uganda

For the International Day of Persons with Disabilities on Dec. 3 2014 we have updated an Upstream Journal article published in 2005 on the rights of the disabled in Uganda.

Most physically disabled people had no access to wheelchairs or crutches. Many were seen by their families as curses or bad omens. In rural areas they’re at high risk of extreme poverty because of the lack of access to education, health care, housing and employment.

Some innovative advocacy at the local level in Uganda.

Some innovative advocacy at the local level in Uganda.

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  • Mar 10 / 2010
  • 0
Journal

World in crisis: four global challenges four Canadian responses

Paul Martin

Paul Martin

Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May

George Stroumboulopoulos

George Stroumboulopoulos

William Watson

William Watson

Julia Pyper

Julia Pyper

I’m a young Canadian who wants to know what the world will look like in 20 years. I want to know the challenges I will face. And I want to know about the major issues in the world today, so I can imagine a better tomorrow.

As naturally curious and self-aware beings, humans have often questioned the future, and have been skeptical about its promise. Shortly after the horrific First World War, Yeats described the apocalypse he felt was close at hand in his poem “The Second Coming”: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; mere anarchy is loosed upon the world. The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere the ceremony of innocence is drowned.”

Today, there is also a lot to be concerned about. The world is experiencing multiple global crises — a severe economic downturn, persistent global poverty, climate change, war and conflict, and resource depletion. It’s difficult not to be discouraged. Continue Reading

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  • Oct 28 / 2007
  • 0
Journal

Finding Justice in Uganda Local Reconciliation or International Court

woman-on-mat

Walking along the road between Sudan and Uganda, near the Atiak IDP camp, I met this woman relaxing in the shade. She waved me over and whipped off the colorful cloth she had around her hair to reveal a full head of white. I had my camera, and we laughed over the pictures for a while. Most people don’t speak English that far north, so we ended up communicating by gestures and the few Lwo words I knew.

In Northern Uganda, people are divided over how they should seek justice for the actions of the Lord’s Revolutionary Army in the long civil war. The International Criminal Court, an attempt to establish an international norm that will dissuade future perpetrators, is considered slow and difficult. The alternative, mato oput, is a local cultural process first used by the Acholi people of the region to settle disputes between families. It consists of symbolic actions performed between perpetrator and victim followed by material compensation and clan reconciliation. Continue Reading

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