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The Upstream Journal

A magazine on social justice since 1975

Posts Tagged / trafficking

  • May 01 / 2012
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Journal

The Trafficking in North Korean women

North Korean Women

Many North Korean women in China live with local men in de facto marriages, Some trafficked into marriage or prostitution. Even if they have lived there for years, they are not entitled to legal residence and face the risk of arrest and repatriation. Many children of unrecognized marriages are forced to live without a legal identity or access to elementary education. (Human Rights Watch 2012) The North Korean woman in this photo is anonymous. Photo: Joseph Ferris.

Mi-Ran Kim says she defected from North Korea to China for the first time when she was thirty-six. Driven by hunger, she crossed the border without the help of a smuggling broker, but was caught and sold to an older man. Refusing to live in a forced marriage, she returned to North Korea.

When Kim escaped again, she was forcibly repatriated to North Korea and sent to a Bowibu prison, a political gulag, where she was beaten, violated and tortured. “While my hands were tied behind my back, they kicked my sides and my breasts,” she said. “I couldn’t even feel the pain because I was losing my mind.” Continue Reading

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  • May 01 / 2011
  • 0
Journal

Sex Trafficking in Canada

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Human trafficking is the fastest growing industry criminal industry in the world. The International Labour Organization estimates that criminals make a profit of almost US$ 32 billion per year from trafficking, mainly from sexual exploitation.

Although trafficking is commonly identified with Asia or Eastern Europe, the domestic aspect of the problem is mostly absent from current discourses on sex trafficking in Canada. Up to 60% of prostituted women are aboriginal girls, and more than 75% of aboriginal girls under the age of 18 have been sexually abused. Since 1980, over 500 aboriginal women have disappeared, presumably murdered or involved in sexual exploitation. Continue Reading

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