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The Upstream Journal

A magazine on social justice since 1975

Posts Tagged / iran

  • Nov 24 / 2014
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Journal

Update: Iran’s female political prisoners

In May 2010, The Upstream Journal ran an article about the imprisonment of women who had organized the “Million Signatures” campaign for women’s rights in Iran. Now we revisit the situation of those women…

bahareh-hedayat-campaign

Poster from Iranian rights group. There are at least 50 women imprisoned for their politics or religion (several are Bahá’í). Here is one example, picked at random: Nasrin Sotoudeh – lawyer and human rights activist, six-year sentence, has served three years. Mother of two. Has launched four hunger strikes behind bars in protest of the unlawful treatment of herself and her family members.

Iran recently executed young Reyhaneh Jabbari. She was hanged on October 25, 2014 after spending seven years in prison for killing a man who attacked her.
It’s not the first time we’ve heard about Iran when it comes to human rights abuse and especially its treatment of women. In May 2010 the Upstream Journal published the story of Bahareh Hedayat and Mahboubeh Karami, among other activists, imprisoned in 2009 for advocating for the “One Million Signatures” campaign to abolish laws discriminating against women. Continue Reading

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  • May 01 / 2011
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Journal

Enemies of the Islamic Republic

Grand Ayatillah Yousuf Sannei

– Grand Ayatollah Yousuf Saanei, now considered the most prominent clerical reformist, commenting on the anti-government protesters in Iran. Saanei is a leader with the Green Movement, pushing for greater freedom and an accountable democracy.

“Their action is in defence of their rights and against the injustice and oppression they suffer at the hands of that ruling system. Such an action is not only permissible but also, in some cases and stages, obligatory.”

– Grand Ayatollah Yousuf Saanei.

Ayatollah Seyyed Hossein Kazemeini Boroujerdi is an Iranian political prisoner, jailed in Evin prison since 2006. An outspoken critic of the Islamic Republic, Boroujerdi is an advocate for democracy, human rights, religious freedoms and the separation of religion from politics. He is opposed to Vilayet – i Faqih, the system that rules Iran by clerical jurisprudence. Continue Reading

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  • May 10 / 2010
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Journal

The Million Signatures Campaign: Iranian women face imprisonment for demanding their rights

Bahareh HedayatIn

Bahareh HedayatIn. In May she was sentenced by the Revolutionary Court to nine years in prison, on charges of “propaganda against the regime through interviews with foreign media, insulting the Leader and the President, and disrupting public order by participation in illegal gatherings.” Time was also added from a suspended sentence for activities at Amir Kabir University. in 2006. Photo: Raha Asgarizadeh

Mahboubeh Karami and Bahareh Hedayat are among the inmates of Iran’s notorious Evin prison for fighting for the abolition of laws discriminating against women.

Karami was arrested in March and placed in solitary confinement, even though the charges against her remain to be clarified and she has not been able to meet with her lawyer. She told her family she was to be charged with “participating in illegal protests and membership in the group Human Rights Activists in Iran.” She has been in touch with her family by phone, and her physical condition is reported to be worsening.

Hedayat, a student activist, was arrested in December 2009 during a gathering in front of Evin prison in solidarity with the families of recent political detainees.

Both are involved with the “Million Signatures Campaign,” which aims to show the Islamic Republic of Iran that both men and women want equal rights for Iranian women. Its original goal was to get signatures of support from one million Iranian nationals.

Continue Reading

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