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Upstream Journal

magazine on human rights & social justice

Posts Tagged / hindu

  • Nov 01 / 2009
  • 1
Journal

The Dalits of Bangladesh

The term "Dalit" is a Sanskrit word that means “those who have been broken and ground down deliberately by those above them in the social hierarchy." Dalits live at risk of discrimination, dehumanization, violence, and enslavement through human trafficking every day. Dalits constitute the largest number of people categorized as victims of modern-day slavery. - Dalit Freedom Network

The term “Dalit” is a Sanskrit word that means “those who have been broken and ground down deliberately by those above them in the social hierarchy.” Dalits live at risk of discrimination, dehumanization, violence, and enslavement through human trafficking every day. Dalits constitute the largest number of people categorized as victims of modern-day slavery. – Dalit Freedom Network

The lowest of the Hindu castes, these “untouchables” fight for a voice

The Pongue Sweeper Colony, a dense network of one-room shanty houses built from scavenged bamboo, wood, and corrugated metal, sits on what is essentially an oversized ditch between the Dhaka Orthopedic Hospital and the World Bank in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The ground in the slum is wet and stagnant, the homes built on bamboo poles two or three feet off the ground. Often, more than one family lives in a single house, without electricity or sanitation. They share latrines dug into the earth and get their drinking water from a small pipe that winds its way through the reeking debris.

Most of the one hundred and ten families there are “sweepers” – cleaners of the city’s roads and sewer systems. They are Dalits, the lowest of the Hindu castes, for centuries “untouchable.”

N. Sree Ramu, the twenty-eight year old Joint Secretary of the Bangladesh Dalits Human Rights (BDHR) organization, lives here with his wife and three year old daughter. While showing me around he told me that his family and most of the others in the colony have been there since the government of Bangladesh plowed over their old shanty houses and relocated them from another part of the city in 1993 – their fourth relocation since 1979. Continue Reading

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  • Oct 28 / 2007
  • 0
Journal

Murder Ignored-Seeking justice after 2002 Hindu-Muslim violence in Gujarat

India Communal Riots-Symbol

A gathering of radical Hindus in 2002 turned into a riot at Babri Masjid, Ayodhya, setting off sectarian violence that killed more than 2,000 people in the weeks following.

Gopal Menonc’s film “Hey Ram” chronicles twelve days of anti-Muslim riots in Gujarat, India, in 2002. Years later, these crimes remain unpunished, perpetuating what is being called the “Muslim Indian genocide.”

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