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Upstream Journal

magazine on human rights & social justice

Posts Tagged / farming

  • May 14 / 2014
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Journal

Food Security: Is It Necessary But Not Enough?

Food sovereignty is mandate for the starving children (Source: FMSC Distribution Partner - Kenya)

Food sovereignty is mandatory for the starving children
(Source: FMSC Distribution Partner – Kenya)

The debate over food is polarized. In the diplomatic world, hunger is more often discussed in terms of food security. Grassroots movements, on the other hand, are more concerned with food sovereignty as they aim at empowering small-scale farmers. Continue Reading

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  • Apr 17 / 2014
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Journal

International Day of Peasants’ Struggles

Did you know that two thirds of the world’s people get their food supply from small-scale farmers? Did you know that small-scale farmers use only 30% of the world arable land? Or that women produce 70% of the food on earth?
April 17th - Day of Peasant's Struggles. Source: La Via Campesina.

April 17th – Day of Peasant’s Struggles. Source: La Via Campesina

April 17th – Day of Peasant’s Struggles. Source: La Via Campesina.

La Via Campesina, also known as the Peasants’ Movement, stands for 200 million farmers globally, including small and medium-size farmers, indigenous people, women farmers, landless workers, migrants and agricultural workers. It represents 164 organizations from 73 countries, according to its website.

Women produce 70% of the food on earth, but they are severely marginalized, making gender equality an important issue when talking about the rights of small-scale farmers.

More than two thirds of the world’s people are dependent for their food on small-scale farmers, who use only 30% of the world arable land, according to the article written by World Development Movement’s policy officer, Christine Haigh. However, most small-scale farmers struggle to establish their rights to use and manage land, water, seeds, livestock and biodiversity.
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  • Sep 01 / 2010
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Journal

Tree Revolution

The global food crisis, and thinking beyond two dimensional farming

Farming in RWanda

Farming in Rwanda. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization says that global food security will be uncertain for the next two years if wheat and maize production do not rise substantially. Wheat and maize prices have shot past their 2009 highs, cereal stocks have declined by 7%, and food import costs could surpass one trillion US dollars this year. Photo courtesy of the World Agroforestry Centre.

75% of the world’s poor live in rural areas and are involved in farming. Proponents of agroforestry – an indigenous farming technique – believe it is an affordable way to improve food security for individual farmers without creating dependency on large corporations for farming inputs.

Now finding its way into more development strategists’ toolkits, agroforestry can increase crop yields and livestock health on farms sustainably and inexpensively. It could make it easier for impoverished farmers in the third world to improve their livelihoods, gain food security, health benefits and increased incomes.

Agroforestry involves deliberately incorporating trees and shrubs into fields of other “low or medium-storey” crops. Certain types of trees replenish soil, while others produce fruit or animal fodder (coarse food for livestock composed of entire plants). Continue Reading

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